Media Release

 
May 28, 2012

The Regional Municipality of York continues Emerald Ash Borer monitoring survey program

Traps deployed to monitor spread of invasive insect
NEWMARKET – The Regional Municipality of York continues to monitor the spread of the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) with the placement of 250 monitoring traps throughout York Region.
 
Bright green prism-style monitoring traps will be placed in mature ash trees on public lands, to help determine the spread of the EAB.  The invasive species is native to Asia and has no known Canadian predator.  It was first noticed in York Region in 2008.
 
Monitoring traps are being placed approximately four to five metres above-ground and one square kilometre apart in the following municipalities:
 
• Northern portions of the Township of King and the Town of Whitchurch-Stouffville
• Towns of Aurora, Newmarket, East Gwillimbury and Georgina
 
York Region is working co-operatively with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, the Ministry of Natural Resources, conservation authorities and local municipalities to monitor the impact of the insect.
 
Traps feature an adhesive coating on the outside with an EAB-attracting substance on the inside. Signs will be posted in the vicinity of the traps, providing information about the monitoring program. Residents are asked to avoid contact with the traps as they may cause mild skin irritation.
 
For more information on the Emerald Ash Borer, please visit the Canadian Food Inspection Agency website, www.inspection.gc.ca/pests or call 1-866-463-6017. Information can also be found on the front page link at www.york.ca
 
- 30 -
 
Media Contact: Barbara Moss, Corporate Communications, York Region
 1-877-464-9675, ext. 1237 • Cell: 905-505-5775 • barbara.moss@york.ca
 

 
 
Founded in 1971, The Regional Municipality of York is made up of nine municipalities
and provides services to more than one million residents, 29,000 businesses and 495,000 employees.

 For more information visit us at www.york.ca Follow us on : York Region   @YorkRegionGovt  
 
Back to top