December 16, 2004

York Region EMS Vehicles "tie one on for safety" for MADD

 
NEWMARKET York Region Emergency Medical Services (EMS) will tie red ribbons onto all of their emergency vehicles this holiday season in support of MADD Canada's Project Red Ribbon Tie One On For Safety campaign. The campaign aims to stop impaired driving and runs until January 3rd 2005.
 
"York Region EMS paramedics know first-hand the tragic consequences of impaired driving," commented Brad Meekin, General Manager of York Region EMS.
 
Every day, on average, four Canadians are killed and 200 are injured as a result of alcohol and drug-related crashes. Impaired driving is the single leading criminal cause of death in Canada. Impaired driving kills or seriously injures 75,000 Canadian men, women and children each year.
 
The Tie One On For Safety campaign involves the simple act of tying a red ribbon to one's vehicle as a public commitment and reminder to drive sober during this busy and socially active time of year. More than four million people across Canada flew MADD Canada's red ribbon last year.
 
MADD (Mother's Against Drunk Driving) is a non-profit organization that is committed to stopping impaired driving and supporting victims. For details, contact 1-800-665-6233 or visit www.madd.ca.
 
For more information on York Region EMS or other health-related questions, contact York Region Health Services Health Connection at 1-800-361-5653 or visit www.york.ca.
 
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Contact:  Kim Clark, York Region Health Services
905-830-4444 Ext. 4101
kim.clark@york.ca
 
    

The Regional Municipality of York is committed to providing cost-effective, quality services that respond to the needs of our rapidly growing communities.  York Region is comprised of the following nine area municipalities:  Aurora, East Gwillimbury, Georgina, King, Markham, Newmarket, Richmond Hill, Vaughan and Whitchurch-Stouffville.  For more information, visit our Web site at:  www.region.york.on.ca

Contact: Patrick Casey, Senior Media Relations Specialist, York Region

 
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